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News | Brake Disc 2.0

Buderus Guss innovation reduces brake dust by up to 90

Circular in shape, the size of a plate, and as thick as a thumb – long before ABS, ESP, airbags, and other technologies, the braking disc made driving safer, significantly shortened braking distances, and contributed to reducing the number of accidents. At present, the car part is attracting attention for another reason: brake dust. The lion’s share of particulate matter is the product of road, tire, and brake dust, and not the result of fuel combustion. According to State Institute for the Environment, Measurements and Conservation in Baden Württemberg, 32 percent of particle emissions in road traffic come from breaking and tires, with about half coming from braking dust.

To improve urban air quality, braking dust must be significantly reduced. To this end, The Bosch subsidiary Buderus Guss has developed the iDisc. Compared with a conventional braking disc, it reduces brake dust production by up to 90 percent. “Bosch has not only been working to maintain air quality under the hood,“ says Dr. Dirk Hoheisel, the member of the Bosch board of management whose responsibilities include Buderus Guss. “The iDisc is the braking disc 2.0”.

Clean and safe

The iDisc’s unique selling point, the prefixed “i“, stands for innovation: it is a hard metal coating made of tungsten carbide, which is currently only offered by Buderus Guss. The basis of the disc is a conventional grey cast iron brake disc, of which the Bosch subsidiary produces up to 20 million units per year. To turn it into an iDisc, the friction rings are treated mechanically, thermally, and galvanically in a process that Buderus Guss and Bosch research developed over many years, and are ultimately coated. The iDisc is not only clean, it is also safe and has a longer life cycle: The braking power is comparable to that of a ceramic brake and the iDisc lasts twice along as a conventional brake disc.

Gerhard Pfeifer, the President of Buderus Guss, is convinced that the iDisc will succeed: “Against the backdrop of the ongoing particulate matter debate in many countries and cities around the world, all signs point to a breakthrough.” After all, brake discs will be needed in cars for decades still, and they are being produced in increasing numbers: in the passenger car segment alone, global demand exceeded 330 million units in 2016.

More information on the iDisc can be found here.

News | Food and friendship

Bosch supports Munaychay, a children’s village in Peru

The Munaychay children’s village is situated at 3,000 meters above sea level, a half-hour drive from the Peruvian valley town of Urumbamba. The village is home to around 70 children whose parents have either passed away, or who are unwilling or unable to take care of their children. Carmen Muñoz Angulo, who heads the village, says: “When they come to us, many of the children are traumatized and have to learn how to trust again.” The children live in small groups, each of which has a house mother. Thanks to Munaychay, the children are gaining new possibilities. Not only to they have rooves over their heads, they can also go to school.

Bosch supports the children’s village in a number of ways. The company has donated a schoolbus, a solar-powered water heating system, and a range of household appliances. What is more, for the past five years, Primavera has given the village money, books, and other donations in kind. The aid initiative, which is run by Bosch associates, supports projects all over the world that aim to help children in need. In addition to this, a group of 15 volunteers – most of them from Germany – supports the local team in the Peruvian mountains on a regular basis. “Before they came here, the children in the village had practically no prospects besides a life of poverty,” says Asunta Tapia, the head of HR at the Bosch regional company in Peru and a member of Primavera. “Now they have a brighter future ahead of them. And that’s why supporting them is so important.”

Here, Bosch would like to introduce three children and young people from the Munaychay children’s village.

“This is my home, my family,“ says 15-year-old Luis. He has lived in the children’s village for ten years with his sister Milagros and two of his eight brothers. Their family was poor and they were often beaten. In Munaychay, Luis has earned to play traditional Andean instruments like the Charango and the Quena flute. Later on, he hopes to study music.  

Milagros, 17, will soon graduate from school and leave the village to study psychology at university in Lima. To earn the money she needs to finance her studies, she wants to work as a hairdresser.

Two years ago, Sarah came to the village when she ran away from a violent family life. Now, "food and friendship" are the two things that are most important to her. At school, the 11-year-old is interested in biology. “I want to become a veterinarian.”

More information on the Munaychay children’s village can be found here. And further details on the Primavera initiative can be found here.

News | A small box with a big effect

Connected Bosch solution measures urban air quality

An innovative system that measures air quality is the latest Bosch smart city solution. In cooperation with Intel, Bosch has developed a microclimate monitoring system that already contributes to improving the lives of people who live in cities. We spoke to Mahesh Chikodi, the head of business development at Bosch in the U.K., who explained how the system works.

Mr. Chikodi, a system that measures air quality doesn’t seem to be anything new.

In cities, there are often measuring stations for ambient air. These stations are actual laboratories in which experts work and can evaluate data. Our solution is much smaller: our system is about one one-hundredth the size of conventional facilities. It is a small box that is easy to install at about a tenth of the cost.

Does the small box have the same capabilities as the large measuring stations?  

We’ve equipped the system with high-precision miniature sensors that can measure different gases such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide, as well as the relative humidity, temperature, and light and noise levels. We can thus reliably record 12 parameters that are relevant for the analysis of air quality. Conventional measuring stations only measure the air at a few locations to determine air quality values for the entire city. Because of its low price, the Bosch solution can measure at ten or twenty locations across the city rather than just two or three.

Where does the climate data that the system gathers end up?

All the data can be recorded, retrieved, and evaluated in real time – around the clock and using different devices. This means I can respond to different situations flexibly: for example, a hybrid city bus can use its electric drive in instances where a city neighborhood’s air quality is bad.

How can this data help make the lives of city dwellers better?

The microclimate monitoring system monitors air quality in a comprehensive manner by measuring and evaluating pollution in a particular region. State organizations and companies can use the data the system has gathered to come up with targeted air pollution reduction measures. With our systems, we create benefits for people and the environment and increase productivity.

Is the solution already in use?

In Pune in India, the system is already measuring air quality at 50 spots across the city. One day, each inhabitant may have access to important data regarding air quality of their own immediate surroundings. – in real time via a smart phone app. Before I go jogging, I can thus check which areas of my city have high levels of air pollution and should be avoided, and where I can breathe easy.

More information on Bosch smart city solutions can be found here.

News | The learning network for energy efficiency

Bosch Mexico connects companies for more energy efficiency

10 organizations have one target in common: smart energy management. To reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions in Mexico, in July 2017 Bosch launched an energy efficiency network there. The first national corporate network of its kind enables actors from different Bosch locations to share knowledge and put joint innovative energy solutions into practice. To this end, Bosch works with several local partners, among them the Mexican energy ministry, the German-Mexican Chamber of Commerce and Industry, as well as the German International Development Agency (GIZ).

More climate protection at a lower cost

Within the framework of the learning network, the participating organizations have taken on different tasks: they promote the development of new energy-saving measures, organize workshops with energy experts, and offer technical support in the implementation of energy management systems, in line with ISO 50001. To this end, experts conducts regular training sessions and webinars at Bosch facilities, and offers advice on the topic of energy efficiency. The company has already invested more than 550,000 Mexican pesos (approx. 24,300 euros) in the learning network and is expected a payback about 2 years. Through energy efficiency projects such as the instalment of efficient frequency inverters and cooling systems at their locations, the network members will be able to reduce their annual energy consumption and get cost savings. Afterwards, the participating companies will decide whether or not they wish to extend their participation in the network.

Smart Bosch energy solutions

The Bosch Group has already implemented energy management systems at 42 locations worldwide, 30 of which have received external certification. In addition to this, the company offers intelligent solutions that allow retailers, suppliers, measuring stations, and network operators to improve their energy efficiency. These include, for instance, the Rollout Process Manager and Meter Gateway Manager software applications, which automate processes and thus reduce process costs. Digital monitoring tools such as the Bosch Energy Platform continuously record and evaluate the energy efficiency of facilities to make recommendations for improvement. Bosch energy solutions are already in use at 250 energy companies around the world, and they continue to be developed further.

More information on Bosch intelligent energy solutions can be found here (available in German language only) .

News | A win-win situation

Bosch Feuerbach offers jobs for people with disabilities

At 8 a.m., Oliver Kroll meets with his colleagues at the team board to discuss the tasks of the day. He then heads to his work bench. Today, he is going to prepare a diesel injection system for an intermediate inspection. Bosch has cooperated with bhz e.V., a Stuttgart NGO, to create the conditions that have allowed Kroll to become a permanent member of the production team at the Feuerbach test workshop. The association is committed to supporting people with disabilities at its own workshop for people with special needs. Oliver Kroll worked there until last June. He then joined Bosch for a trial period of one year.

Mr. Kroll at the endurance test bench for a new DS injection nozzle

A broad range of tasks

The job was created thanks to Andreas Jentsch, the site manager, and his 20 associates. “We didn’t hesitate to hire someone with a disability. Rather, we looked forward to taking on the challenge,” says Andreas Jenstsch. “We had the impression that Mr. Kroll would be a good fit for us”. The team was right. He adapted well to his new environment and is very satisfied with his job: “The tasks are a lot more complex and diverse than I thought they would be,” he says. “I am learning a lot and my colleagues help me try new things.” Mr. Kroll’s supervisor is also pleased with his progress: “He contributes a great deal, and working with Oliver Kroll is a win-win situation.” The aim is to offer the new colleague long-term job prospects at Bosch.

Active support    

Mr. Kroll’s job is just one example of the ways in which Bosh strives to offer equal opportunities to people with disabilities. In 2016, 6.58 percent of associates in Germany had special needs, a share higher than the legal minimum. Bosch aims to make day-to-day work as accessible as possible for people with disabilities, and uses a growing number of its own Industry 4.0 products to this end. The company is currently collaborating with two Fraunhofer Institutes to determine how the APAS Assistant robot can best support people with physical or mental disabilities.

More information on the APAS assistance systems can be found here.