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News | COP 22: Setting a good example

At the world climate conference, Bosch presented best practice examples of CO2 reduction strategies

How can companies contribute to protecting the climate? This was one of the questions discussed at the 22nd world climate conference in Marrakech. From November 7 to November 18, delegates from more than 190 countries convened to talk about the implementation of the Paris climate agreement, which set the aim of limiting global warming to a maximum of two degrees Celsius. Until now, no national plans have been introduced to put the plan into practice.

 

 

On November 14, a press conference on “Business Leadership for Global Climate Action”, which was held by the International Chamber of Industry and Commerce on the occasion of COP 22, addressed the question of how companies can contribute to climate protection. Three representatives of global companies, among them Bosch, presented examples from their sustainability programs. Maxime Bureau, 3M’s Director Government Affairs Europe and a member of the company’s EMEA Operating Committee EMEA, talked about the ways in which 3M helps its customers reuse greenhouse gases, among other things. Jorge Soto, Sustainable Development Director of Braskem, the world’s largest producer of biopolymers, presented a three-pillar model that showed the company’s sustainable business practices throughout the supply chain.

Bernhard Schwager, head of sustainability at Bosch, presented the company’s climate protection activities. Internally, Bosch has set itself the aim of reducing its CO2 emissions relative to value-added by 35 percent over 2007 levels. By 2015, the company had already achieved a 29.7 percent reduction. Doing business in a sustainable manner has also paid off in economic terms: between 2007 and 2014, Bosch was able to save some 530 million euros in energy costs as a result of internal measures. Moreover, Bosch uses the expertise it has gained in internal processes to advise other companies.

At Bosch, energy efficiency also plays an important role at the product level. In recent years, Bosch products across business sectors have become more efficient, and their carbon footprint has been reduced. In the realm of mobility, the Bosch strategy is twofold. On the one hand, the company is continuously working to reduce the emissions of the internal combustion engine, and to make it more efficient. On the other, the company is investing in driving e-mobility forward, for instance with research in the area of battery technology.

 

From left to right: Karsten Sachs (BAMB), Sabine Nallinger (Stiftung 2°) and Dr. Urs Ruth (Bosch)

 

During the “German Hour – Challenges and Opportunities for companies in the implementation of the Paris Agreement” panel discussion that was held by Stiftung 2° at the German pavilion, panelists discussed the significance of the 2050 climate protection plan that the German business community concluded on November 14. Among other things, topics discussed included the extent to which companies could contribute to achieving the targets of national climate protection plans. During the discussion, Dr. Urs Ruth, Chief Expert Climate Change and Energy Resources at Robert Bosch GmbH, presented the approaches that Bosch has taken. Technical neutrality, he argued, is a central point: change must occur at a transformative rather than at a destructive pace, and e-fuels must be seen as a possible path away from fossil fuels in the transport sector. Other panelists included Dr. Karsten Sach, head of the international development department at the German Ministry of the Environment, and Sabine Nallinger, Managing Director of Stiftung 2°.

The video of the “Business Leadership for Global Climate Action” press conference can be seen here.

The video of the “Marrakech and beyond – a perspective from business” panel discussion, which Bernhard Schwager also took part in, can be found here.

Current examples of climate protection initiatives at Bosch can be found in the Sustainability Report.

News | COP 22: Doing sustainable business

At a panel discussion of the International Chamber of Commerce, Bosch discussed climate protection concepts for emerging markets

Last year, the average global temperature was about 1.2 degrees warmer than before industrialization, making 2016 the warmest year on record. During his presentation at the 22nd World Climate Conference (COP 22) in Marrakech, Petteri Taalas, Secretary General of the World Meteorology Organization (WNO), emphasized the urgency of implementing the Paris climate agreement that global leaders signed last year. 

 

 

One of the biggest challenges of climate protection lies in transforming the economy. The topic was addressed at a panel discussion entitled “On the way to a resilient, low-carbon future”, which was organized by the International Chamber of Commerce during the World Climate Conference. Panelists from academia and business discussed a range of ways in which existing climate protection solutions could be applied in new markets, as well as how sustainable innovations could be made market ready. Markus Thill, President of Bosch Africa, was among the panelists. He argued that emerging markets in Africa offered many opportunities for sustainable economic growth. For instance, smart networking in agriculture could lead to more efficient use of water and help reduce crop losses. In mining,  start/stop systems have the potential to reduce the CO2 emissions of work vehicles by up to 20 percent. 

 

Panelists (from left to right): Russell Mills, Vice-Chair Energy and Climate Leadership Group, ICCA; Dr. Markus Thill, President Region Africa, Bosch Group; Mohamed Ourdedi, moderator and Secretary General of Morocco’s Chamber of Commerce and Industry; and Stuart Neil, Senior Executive Director of the World Energy Council.  

 

With its population of more than one billion people, Africa is a major growth market for Bosch. The company has been active on the continent since 1906, and currently employs some 700 associates in ten countries. With its local presence, Bosch is paving the way for the use of sustainable solutions in the areas of mobility, industrial technology, and consumer goods. Not only does the company provide technology, it also invests in infrastructure and individual education and training programs. For instance, Bosch is involved in the “Afrika kommt!” (Africa is coming!) initiative, which offers young executives from sub-Saharan Africa scholarships in Germany.

The recording of the press conference on the International Chamber of Commerce’s event can be found here and here.

More information on sustainable Bosch solutions can be found here.

Current information on the 22nd World Climate Conference can be found here.

 

 

Image sources: Bosch and COP 22.

News | Innovative energy storage systems

Bosch is involved in a number of research projects that focus on developing innovative energy storage concepts

By 2050, renewable sources of energy will cover more than 80 percent of energy needs. For this reason, offsetting the natural fluctuations in power generated by wind, the sun, and water will be decisive. Energy storage systems will play a central role in this regard. In cooperation with partners from business and science, Bosch is working on a number of pilot projects.

 

 

The BiLawE project: electric cars as intelligent energy storage systems

Currently a power bank for mobile phones, an electric vehicle’s battery storage system could one day become part of the power grid, receiving energy from renewable sources. In other words, whenever there is a surplus of energy from green energy sources, the batteries of connected vehicles would be charged. At the same time, the energy storage systems of electric vehicles could also feed energy back into the grid. As part of the publicly funded BiLaWe (bidirectional, inductive charging systems as efficient parts of the power grid) project, Bosch is currently collaborating with the Fraunhofer Gesellschaft to find out how this principle can be applied to develop a bidirectional charge system. “In order to master this task, electric vehicles must be connected to the power grid as often as possible and for as long as possible,” explains Philipp Schumann, a project manager at the Bosch research campus in Renningen. The project partners think that this requirement can be met with publicly accessible inductive charging stations. A vehicle that is located at such a station would be charged without contact via a magnetic field. Since it wouldn’t be necessary to connect the vehicle to the charging station with a cable, the vehicles would be more frequently linked to the energy source. The project is financed by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy and is set to run for three years.

More information on inductive charging systems can be found here.

 

The “Battery Second Life” project: The rebirth of the car battery

A joint project between Vattenfall, BMW, and Bosch is focusing on the topic of stable power grids. To this end, 2,600 functional used batteries from electric vehicles were used in the development phase: they were connected to one another and turned into a large energy storage system. This system, which has been in operation in a test phase since September 2016, can make energy available within seconds, thus offsetting fluctuations in the power grid. Its capacity is sufficient to supply power to a an average two-person household for a period of seven months. The “Battery 2nd Life” project began in 2013 and is set to run for five years. Among other things, the aim is to make the new energy storage system a lasting part of the energy system.

More information on the energy storage project in Hamburg can be found here.

 

The DESS2020+ project: storing energy with hydrogen

The aim of the “District Energy Storage and Supply System 2020+” is to stop transporting power generated from renewable sources over large distances in the future. Here, too, opportunities for decentralized energy storage are a central focus. More specifically, Bosch and the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE) are investigating how an enclosed residential area can be supplied with solar energy that is generated, stored, and consumed locally. The aim is to make energy available to some 100 households as well as to the owners of hydrogen-powered vehicles. To achieve this, the researchers are developing a system based on three core components: a proton exchange membrane electrolyzer (PEM electrolyzer), a fuel cell, and several hydrogen storage tanks. The interplay between them works like this: the PEM electrolyzer uses energy from renewable sources of energy to divide water into hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen is stored in tanks and can be used at any time to operate the fuel cells. These, in turn, deliver heating energy for the connected building as required. In contrast to other energy sources, large amounts of hydrogen can be stored at a relatively low price, and this is a major advantage. What is more, it can contribute to eco-friendly mobility. A hydrogen dispenser could be installed at a location where fuel-cell powered vehicles could be filled within a few minutes. Set to run until 2018, the research project is part of the German Federal Ministry of the Economy and Energy’s “Research for an eco-friendly, reliable, and affordable energy supply” research project.

More information on new storage technology for green energy can be found here.

News | Get in touch with technology

Bosch invited girls to take part in the Czech „Girls' Day“ in Jihlava

by Lucia Jaszayova

Who says that girls are not interested in technology? 20 girls – daughters of Bosch associates in the Czech Republic – proved otherwise. On October 14, they participated in the „Girls' Day“ held at the Jihlava plant. As a part of the program the girls, aged from eleven to 13, were divided into teams and given a task to build a tractor model using metal construction blocks.  

 

 

After lunch, the participants took the chance to visit the production site. They got an impression of the workplace of their parents and some valuable information regarding Bosch’s support of technical education of women.   

Finally, there was another competition prepared for them. To get the title „Technikgirl“, the girls had to demonstrate their knowledge not only about Bosch, but also about the tools that are used in the production plant.

The aim of the event was to stimulate girls' interest in technology by allowing them to peek into the world of engineering. "We want to encourage the girls. They should discover what technology is about and find out that working in technical professions can be fun", said Ralph Carle, Commercial Director of Bosch Diesel s.r.o.

The Girls’ Day in Jihlava is but one example how Bosch is supporting initiatives to spark children’s interest in technology. Similar events are held in Germany and Austria each year. Additionally, Bosch is a founding member of the “Wissensfabrik – Unternehmen für Deutschland” (Knowledge Factory – Companies for Germany). The initiative aims at giving children and young people a better understanding of business and technology. To support that objective, Bosch participates in some 280 educational partnerships with kindergartens and schools.

 

About Bosch Diesel s.r.o.:

Bosch Diesel s.r.o. employs 4.300 associates producing high pressure pumps for diesel engines, pressure tanks and control valves for the Common Rail system. Since the topic of technical education is very important in the region, Bosch Diesel s.r.o. is coming up with new approaches and activities. Since 2002, the company has led an own training center. It also supports dual training and technically oriented students.

More information on Bosch in the Czech Republic can be found here.

More information on the “Wissensfabrik” can be found here.

News | The trucks of tomorrow – efficient and connected

Automated driving is making heavy-duty trucks more efficient and safer

According to a recent PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) study entitled “The era of digitalized trucking: transforming the logistics value chain”, the trucks of the future could be more eco-friendly and more economical as automation gradually progresses.

Bosch solutions are also contributing to this progress, and thus helping make long-haul commercial traffic more sustainable. “Networked and automated commercial vehicles are the future, and we want to make a major contribution to shaping it,” said Dr. Markus Hayn, member of the Bosch board of management, at the 66th IAA Commercial Vehicles, during his presentation of the VisionX concept. Using a 40-ton truck as an example, the concept describes how the truck of the future could look. It will comprise cutting-edge technology and a hybrid drive, and will be partially automated.

 

 

VisionX makes platooning possible, meaning that a truck lines up in a convoy the moment it drives on the highway. The trucks are connected to one another, and can thus synchronize their acceleration, braking, and steering behavior. Moreover, via the Bosch IoT cloud, they can share information with each other on routes, traffic, and detours in real time. This makes it possible to reduce down time to a minimum, and to provide early warning of hazards and roadblocks. This, in turn, enables steady driving and helps avoid sudden braking and subsequent acceleration. At the same time, platooning technology makes it possible for trucks to drive up closer to the vehicles ahead, and this reduces aerodynamic drag. In this way, fuel savings of up to 11 percent will be possible in the future. According to the Bosch VisionX concept study, powertrain electrification is also contributing to making trucking more efficient, as it significantly increases the resource efficiency of long-haul travel.  

More information on the VisionX concept study can be found here.