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News | Brake Disc 2.0

Buderus Guss innovation reduces brake dust by up to 90

Circular in shape, the size of a plate, and as thick as a thumb – long before ABS, ESP, airbags, and other technologies, the braking disc made driving safer, significantly shortened braking distances, and contributed to reducing the number of accidents. At present, the car part is attracting attention for another reason: brake dust. The lion’s share of particulate matter is the product of road, tire, and brake dust, and not the result of fuel combustion. According to State Institute for the Environment, Measurements and Conservation in Baden Württemberg, 32 percent of particle emissions in road traffic come from breaking and tires, with about half coming from braking dust.

To improve urban air quality, braking dust must be significantly reduced. To this end, The Bosch subsidiary Buderus Guss has developed the iDisc. Compared with a conventional braking disc, it reduces brake dust production by up to 90 percent. “Bosch has not only been working to maintain air quality under the hood,“ says Dr. Dirk Hoheisel, the member of the Bosch board of management whose responsibilities include Buderus Guss. “The iDisc is the braking disc 2.0”.

Clean and safe

The iDisc’s unique selling point, the prefixed “i“, stands for innovation: it is a hard metal coating made of tungsten carbide, which is currently only offered by Buderus Guss. The basis of the disc is a conventional grey cast iron brake disc, of which the Bosch subsidiary produces up to 20 million units per year. To turn it into an iDisc, the friction rings are treated mechanically, thermally, and galvanically in a process that Buderus Guss and Bosch research developed over many years, and are ultimately coated. The iDisc is not only clean, it is also safe and has a longer life cycle: The braking power is comparable to that of a ceramic brake and the iDisc lasts twice along as a conventional brake disc.

Gerhard Pfeifer, the President of Buderus Guss, is convinced that the iDisc will succeed: “Against the backdrop of the ongoing particulate matter debate in many countries and cities around the world, all signs point to a breakthrough.” After all, brake discs will be needed in cars for decades still, and they are being produced in increasing numbers: in the passenger car segment alone, global demand exceeded 330 million units in 2016.

More information on the iDisc can be found here.

News | A small box with a big effect

Connected Bosch solution measures urban air quality

An innovative system that measures air quality is the latest Bosch smart city solution. In cooperation with Intel, Bosch has developed a microclimate monitoring system that already contributes to improving the lives of people who live in cities. We spoke to Mahesh Chikodi, the head of business development at Bosch in the U.K., who explained how the system works.

Mr. Chikodi, a system that measures air quality doesn’t seem to be anything new.

In cities, there are often measuring stations for ambient air. These stations are actual laboratories in which experts work and can evaluate data. Our solution is much smaller: our system is about one one-hundredth the size of conventional facilities. It is a small box that is easy to install at about a tenth of the cost.

Does the small box have the same capabilities as the large measuring stations?  

We’ve equipped the system with high-precision miniature sensors that can measure different gases such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide, as well as the relative humidity, temperature, and light and noise levels. We can thus reliably record 12 parameters that are relevant for the analysis of air quality. Conventional measuring stations only measure the air at a few locations to determine air quality values for the entire city. Because of its low price, the Bosch solution can measure at ten or twenty locations across the city rather than just two or three.

Where does the climate data that the system gathers end up?

All the data can be recorded, retrieved, and evaluated in real time – around the clock and using different devices. This means I can respond to different situations flexibly: for example, a hybrid city bus can use its electric drive in instances where a city neighborhood’s air quality is bad.

How can this data help make the lives of city dwellers better?

The microclimate monitoring system monitors air quality in a comprehensive manner by measuring and evaluating pollution in a particular region. State organizations and companies can use the data the system has gathered to come up with targeted air pollution reduction measures. With our systems, we create benefits for people and the environment and increase productivity.

Is the solution already in use?

In Pune in India, the system is already measuring air quality at 50 spots across the city. One day, each inhabitant may have access to important data regarding air quality of their own immediate surroundings. – in real time via a smart phone app. Before I go jogging, I can thus check which areas of my city have high levels of air pollution and should be avoided, and where I can breathe easy.

More information on Bosch smart city solutions can be found here.