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News | Bosch launches its new Powertrain Solutions division

Starting in 2018, Bosch will be pooling its e-mobility, gasoline systems, and diesel systems activities in a single division

E-mobility is considered to be the future of the automotive industry. By 2025, there will be an estimated 20 million vehicles with hybrid and electric drives on the world’s roads. In order to further expand this field of business, Bosch is now launching a new division. From 2018 onward, the Powertrain Solutions division will be the home of all drivetrain-related technologies at Bosch. In addition to the new e-mobility unit, Bosch Gasoline Systems and Bosch Diesel Systems will be integrated into the new division.

 

 

A look at the European Union’s CO2 targets shows that powertrain electrification is needed to reduce the average emissions of new vehicles to 95 g/km. Bosch supports this plan and invests some 400 million euros each year to contribute to an e-mobility breakthrough. At the same time, the company has kept up its efforts to further develop the internal combustion engine. In fact, Bosch aims to make current gasoline and diesel engines up to 20 percent more efficient.

In strategic terms, Powertrain Solutions has three core segments: internal combustion engines, hybrid drive systems, and electric vehicles. “Whether fuel or electricity, Bosch will also be bringing energy to drive systems in the future,” says Dr. Rolf Bulander, president of the Mobility Solutions business sector at Robert Bosch GmbH. “Since it isn’t clear today which drive system or which combination of drive types will prevail and when, we have taken a two-pronged approach and are further expanding our expertise both with regard to e-mobility and the internal combustion engine.”

More information on Powertrain Solutions can be found here.

News | 100 years protection, rescues, and fighting fires

On the occasion of its anniversary, the Bosch fire brigade is launching an apprenticeship for plant firemen

The Bosch fire brigade first saw the light of day on February 10, 1917: at the time, fire chief Wendelin Mayr of the Stuttgart fire department and 40 volunteer firefighters laid the foundation for fire fighting at the company. The success story started with a hose cart, an extending ladder, several hand pumps, and two respiratory protective devices. Today, the Bosch fire brigade is active at 60 locations around the world and counts 1,900 part-time and full-time associates who protect the company’s premises 24 hours a day.

 

 

Qualified industrial fire fighters are in high demand all over Germany, and that demand continues to increase. This is because applicants need to meet strict criteria and apprenticeships in industrial fire fighting are few and far between. To improve the situation, Bosch is planning to launch an apprenticeship in 2017 that will be accredited by the Chamber of Industry and Commerce. In so doing, the company will draw on its 100 years of experience. “In the future, we want to train 15 young people each year to perform these tasks,” says Siegfried Czock, who is charge of apprenticeships and continuing education at Bosch.

 

 

The job is multifaceted: in addition to fire prevention, the Bosch fire brigade regularly holds training seminars for associates and carries out environmental protection measures. “When called upon, they respond quickly and know their locations inside and out, so they can effectively protect people and save lives,” says Christoph Kübel, member of the Bosch board of management and head of industrial relations. The Bosch fire brigades also work beyond the walls of the company if required; they have provided manpower and equipment in the past, and are a reliable partner to more than 35 cities and municipalities in Germany. “Bosch fire brigades thus also contribute to municipal fire prevention, and this in turn makes communities safer.”

More information on Bosch fire brigades can be found here.

News | COP 22: Doing sustainable business

At a panel discussion of the International Chamber of Commerce, Bosch discussed climate protection concepts for emerging markets

Last year, the average global temperature was about 1.2 degrees warmer than before industrialization, making 2016 the warmest year on record. During his presentation at the 22nd World Climate Conference (COP 22) in Marrakech, Petteri Taalas, Secretary General of the World Meteorology Organization (WNO), emphasized the urgency of implementing the Paris climate agreement that global leaders signed last year. 

 

 

One of the biggest challenges of climate protection lies in transforming the economy. The topic was addressed at a panel discussion entitled “On the way to a resilient, low-carbon future”, which was organized by the International Chamber of Commerce during the World Climate Conference. Panelists from academia and business discussed a range of ways in which existing climate protection solutions could be applied in new markets, as well as how sustainable innovations could be made market ready. Markus Thill, President of Bosch Africa, was among the panelists. He argued that emerging markets in Africa offered many opportunities for sustainable economic growth. For instance, smart networking in agriculture could lead to more efficient use of water and help reduce crop losses. In mining,  start/stop systems have the potential to reduce the CO2 emissions of work vehicles by up to 20 percent. 

 

Panelists (from left to right): Russell Mills, Vice-Chair Energy and Climate Leadership Group, ICCA; Dr. Markus Thill, President Region Africa, Bosch Group; Mohamed Ourdedi, moderator and Secretary General of Morocco’s Chamber of Commerce and Industry; and Stuart Neil, Senior Executive Director of the World Energy Council.  

 

With its population of more than one billion people, Africa is a major growth market for Bosch. The company has been active on the continent since 1906, and currently employs some 700 associates in ten countries. With its local presence, Bosch is paving the way for the use of sustainable solutions in the areas of mobility, industrial technology, and consumer goods. Not only does the company provide technology, it also invests in infrastructure and individual education and training programs. For instance, Bosch is involved in the “Afrika kommt!” (Africa is coming!) initiative, which offers young executives from sub-Saharan Africa scholarships in Germany.

The recording of the press conference on the International Chamber of Commerce’s event can be found here and here.

More information on sustainable Bosch solutions can be found here.

Current information on the 22nd World Climate Conference can be found here.

 

 

Image sources: Bosch and COP 22.

News | WINners take a sustainable approach to doing business

Bosch publishes WIN-Charter sustainability report 2015

As part of its participation in Baden Württemberg’s Sustainable Business Initiative (WIN), in 2015 Bosch reiterated its commitment to conserving scarce resources and promoting a positive work culture. The company’s aim of doing business in a sustainable manner is based on the 12 principles outlined in the WIN Charter, which describe the elements required to strike a balance between economic, ecological, and social concerns. In the 2015 WIN Charta sustainability report, Bosch set itself measurable targets in the areas of “Energy and Emissions” and “Associate Well-Being”, and defined a broad range of corresponding measures.

 

 

Target 1: Reduce CO2 emissions by 35 percent

During the reporting period, around half of the Bosch research and development budget went toward eco-friendly products that conserve resources. Moreover, the global roll out of an environmental management system that complies with the ISO 14001 standard was also on the agenda. Until now, 235 locations have received external certification, a share of 80 percent. By 2020, Bosch aims to reduce its CO2 emissions relative to value added by 35 percent over the 2007 reference year. The company will do this by systematically improving its environmental performance. This approach is clearly paying off: at the end of 2015, Bosch had already achieved a 29.7 percent reduction.

 

Target 2: 1.7 accidents per million hours worked

Another central WIN Charter topic is occupational safety. To reduce the number of work-related accidents to a minimum, in 2007 Bosch began rolling out occupational safety measures based on the OHSAS 18001 standard. This process has now been completed, with 122 locations certified. As a result, the company has reduced the number of accidents per million hours worked by more than half – from 6.8 to 3.2. By 2020, Bosch aims to reduce this figure to 1.7 accidents per million hours worked.

 

WIN! project: Reducing material losses

Signatories of the WIN Charter have also committed to implementing local sustainability measures. In this spirit, Bosch collaborated on a WIN! project with the Institute for Industrial Ecology at the Pforzheim University of Applied Sciences. The project aims to reduce material losses in production. To this end, the research team monitored and analyzed material and energy flows at Bosch’s location in Waiblingen. The project presented the university with an opportunity to test a material cost calculation method in real-life conditions. Students are taking part in the project in the form of project work and an internship. A bachelor’s thesis is also planned.

 

The Bosch annual WIN Charter report can be downloaded here (only in German available).

News | Managing sustainability

Bosch receives the “Green Controlling Prize”

In a traditionally sustainable company such as Bosch controlling takes on a key role. As “green” consultant of the board of management it ensures that a balance is struck between economic interests and environmental concerns. For this approach to manage sustainability targets, Bosch was honored with the “Green Controlling Prize”, an award of 10,000 euros, at the end of September. The prize was established by the Péter-Horváth Stiftung in cooperation with the International Controllers Association (ICV). Each year, the prize honors best practical solutions for the effective management of ecological programs, projects, or measures. 

 

LTR: Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Péter Horváth, Dr. Richard Watterott, Bernhard Schwager, Dr. Stefan Asenkerschbaumer and Siegfried Gänßlen

 

Dr. Stefan Asenkerschbaumer, deputy CEO of Robert Bosch GmbH, gave a presentation about the basic principles of the “System for strategic and operational environmental controlling,” which Bosch has established in all of its business processes. The company’s e-mobility activities are one example of how Bosch has done this. By developing electric motors, the corresponding power electronics, and components, the company aims to drive powertrain electrification forward. This poses a challenge for controlling, as it is not yet clear when and with which technology a market breakthrough will take place. This is why Bosch relies on scenario analysis, the results of which its financing measures are based on. 

 

In his presentation, Dr. Stefan Asenkerschbaumer, deputy CEO of the board of management of Robert Bosch GmbH, addressed the basic principles of the controlling approach

 

The company’s sustainability targets are characterized by operational controlling, which is carried out in a decentralized manner. The divisions receive targets for their global business activities, which are broken down to the product unit or site level. Responsibilities are then distributed accordingly. In this way, Bosch aims to reduce its CO2 emissions relative to value-added by 35 percent by 2020 over 2007 levels.

“The Bosch solution is a shining example of how ecological concerns are addressed across the board around the world. It shows how associates take the environment into account in their everyday work, and especially illustrates the active role that controllers play as ‘green’ business partners,” said Professor Péter Horváth, who conferred the prize.

The prize money will go toward supporting the Primavera e.V. charitable initiative. Founded by current and former Bosch associates in 1990, the organization supports children in need. Today, it is active in 15 countries and helps provide opportunities for children living in slums.

More information about the “Green Controlling Prize" can be found here (only in German available).

More information on the Primavera e.V. charitable initiative can be found here.

 

Picture source: Horváth & Partners / konferenzfotografie.de