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News | Food and friendship

Bosch supports Munaychay, a children’s village in Peru

The Munaychay children’s village is situated at 3,000 meters above sea level, a half-hour drive from the Peruvian valley town of Urumbamba. The village is home to around 70 children whose parents have either passed away, or who are unwilling or unable to take care of their children. Carmen Muñoz Angulo, who heads the village, says: “When they come to us, many of the children are traumatized and have to learn how to trust again.” The children live in small groups, each of which has a house mother. Thanks to Munaychay, the children are gaining new possibilities. Not only to they have rooves over their heads, they can also go to school.

Bosch supports the children’s village in a number of ways. The company has donated a schoolbus, a solar-powered water heating system, and a range of household appliances. What is more, for the past five years, Primavera has given the village money, books, and other donations in kind. The aid initiative, which is run by Bosch associates, supports projects all over the world that aim to help children in need. In addition to this, a group of 15 volunteers – most of them from Germany – supports the local team in the Peruvian mountains on a regular basis. “Before they came here, the children in the village had practically no prospects besides a life of poverty,” says Asunta Tapia, the head of HR at the Bosch regional company in Peru and a member of Primavera. “Now they have a brighter future ahead of them. And that’s why supporting them is so important.”

Here, Bosch would like to introduce three children and young people from the Munaychay children’s village.

“This is my home, my family,“ says 15-year-old Luis. He has lived in the children’s village for ten years with his sister Milagros and two of his eight brothers. Their family was poor and they were often beaten. In Munaychay, Luis has earned to play traditional Andean instruments like the Charango and the Quena flute. Later on, he hopes to study music.  

Milagros, 17, will soon graduate from school and leave the village to study psychology at university in Lima. To earn the money she needs to finance her studies, she wants to work as a hairdresser.

Two years ago, Sarah came to the village when she ran away from a violent family life. Now, "food and friendship" are the two things that are most important to her. At school, the 11-year-old is interested in biology. “I want to become a veterinarian.”

More information on the Munaychay children’s village can be found here. And further details on the Primavera initiative can be found here.